Thursday, March 27, 2008

Some dude has just shown that a scrambled Rubik's cube can be solved in 25 moves at most, regardless of the starting configuration.

Cool, but I can solve a Rubik's cube through the following very effective methods:
  • By disassembling and reassembling the cube.
  • By rearranging the stickers, duh.

Haha. =)

Monday, March 24, 2008

The Google bot is a giant nut
If you eat too much, you get very fat
Now, the Google bot is a big, big nut
But its delicious nut is not a nut

Friday, March 21, 2008

And Jesus-look-alike prayed.

Thursday, March 20, 2008


Jesus-look-alike is a rock star.

Wednesday, March 19, 2008

Farewell Arthur C. Clarke...

Tuesday, March 18, 2008

I'm watching Jumper (again). The concept is cool, but the story is crap. I hope my friends won't have the same conclusion too. They're probably in for a disappointment once they discover that the movie leaves many things unexplained-- how does their teleportation ability work and how did it originate? Why are the Paladins after them? If the Paladins are after them, then why won't the jumpers organize themselves and form an anti-Paladin group? More importantly, how do the jumpers keep themselves from teleporting in front of a running bus or materializing inside a wall? This implies knowing the exact details of the destination beforehand. Blah, blah, blah.

Anyway, I wish I had teleportation ability. If I had teleportation ability, I'd teleport mid-air while doing whoopee. I wonder how it feels like to do whoopeee while in free fall. Whoopeeeee...

Saturday, March 15, 2008

Because Earth has not yet experienced a full rotation since posting my last journal entry, a significant percentage of the Earth's population still exist on a date of March 14, rendering my licence to communicate in a manner fittingly absurd as a Physicist still valid.

Approximately 8 hours ago, a set of people entered a game simulation involving a virtual interaction of two teams, labeled Terrorists and Counter-terrorists, using processing machines that were interconnected in a network. This set of people simulated a game scenario of life and death by feeding input to the devices, mouse and keyboard, based on their judgement of visual and aural information acquired through the monitor and headset. This set of people perpetually inputted information to the devices, until the upper limit of their organic processes were reached.

Interacting with the game simulation has the expected after-effect of lowering their glucose levels in their bloodstream because the whole process consumes energy. As their glucose levels went below their lower threshold, nerve signals were sent to their brain, signaling parasympathetic reactions that cause these people to seek organic fuel, commonly known as food.

The primary objective of engaging in this simulation was to accelerate the rate of their subjective experience of the space-time conundrum that these people were located in. It was observed that the simulation invokes a discontinuity in space-time, which signals the people's brain to release endorphins. This chemical reaction alters their experience of reality, colloquially known as the state of being happy.

Certain people, however, experienced prolonged exposure to endorphins long after the simulation has ended. This is most likely because of endorphin-caffeine reaction in his bloodstream that drastically altered his brain, causing him to post scientific theories in his journal, also known as a blog.

Friday, March 14, 2008

Pi = 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510582
097494459230781640628620899862803482534211706798214808651328
230664709384460955058223172535940812848111745028410270193852
110555964462294895493038196442881097566593344612847564823378
678316527120190914564856692346034861045432664821339360726024
914127372458700660631558817488152092096282925409171536436789
259036001133053054882046652138414695194151160943305727036575
959195309218611738193261179310511854807446237996274956735188
575272489122793818301194912983367336244065664308602139494639
522473719070217986094370277053921717629317675238467481846766
940513200056812714526356082778577134275778960917363717872146
844090122495343014654958537105079227968925892354201995611212
902196086403441815981362977477130996051870721134999999837297
804995105973173281609631859502445945534690830264252230825334
468503526193118817101000313783875288658753320838142061717766
914730359825349042875546873115956286388235378759375195778185
778053217122680661300192787661119590921642019

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

A complete stranger talked to me at the elevator just a few moments ago. I've got to learn that skill. Small talk is an art that does not come naturally to me. It requires an ego orientation of extraverted feeling, a way of orienting one's self to the environment in terms of a culturally defined language of social relationship.

When people say, "hello, how are you?", people expect me to respond, "I'm fine, thank you."

But I don't want to say "I'm fine, thank you." In fact, I don't want to talk to people at all. Depending on my mood, these are probably the thoughts that go inside my head. If only I could say them:

"Are you inviting me for a multi-level marketing scam?"

"Go away. You're invading my personal space."

"Duh, doesn't it look obvious?"

"You have nice boobs."

Rather than change myself into someone that I'm not, maybe I need to learn how to say those things in a polite way instead:

Girl: "Hello, what account are you handling?"
Me: *blink*
Girl: "You're working at People Support, right?"
Me: *blink* *press elevator button*
Girl: "Oh, you're not. You seem like the quiet type."
Me: *smile*
Girl: "Hello??? Why are you so quiet?"
Me: "You have nice boobs."